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Collective Power of Inclusion

In September of last year, thousands of women gathered in Bahia, Brazil for AWID’s women’s rights Forum to celebrate the collective power of women and the importance of intersectionality. Due to a concerted effort by passionate activists, donors, and AWID, for the first time women with disabilities were visible participants in this important global conference, demonstrating their power and rightful place within the women’s rights movement.

Source: Disability Rights Fund

#YoungFeministVisions: A Photo Project

#YoungFeministVisions is a project that pushes young feminists to exercise self reflection, to think within and beyond their experiences of oppression, and envision what a just and feminist future could really look like.

Gender & Development: Fundamentalisms

Religious fundamentalisms invoke religion in order to gain political, social and economic power. Fundamentalist strands exist in all religions and share the same characteristics, including a particular focus on the control of women's bodies and lives.

How feminist art can rock CSW

Feminist artists have been invited to participate in a UN Women-organised festival at CSW 61 to produce films around the theme of “The Personal is Political.” What happens when artists enter spaces to which they are not traditionally invited?

Source: AWID

How feminist art can rock CSW

Feminist artists have been invited to participate in a UN Women-organised festival at CSW 61 to produce films around the theme of “The Personal is Political.” What happens when artists enter spaces to which they are not traditionally invited?

Source: AWID

How feminist art can rock CSW

Feminist artists have been invited to participate in a UN Women-organised festival at CSW 61 to produce films around the theme of “The Personal is Political.” What happens when artists enter spaces to which they are not traditionally invited?

Source: AWID

Why Defending Human Rights Is Women’s Work

Joye Braun recalls setting up her tipi in snow last April at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. The camp founded by LaDonna Brave Bull Allard, a beloved elder Native woman, was named Iŋyaŋ Wakháŋagapi Othí, meaning Sacred Stone, which is the pre-Colonial name of the Cannonball River area.

Source: Yes Magazine